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A Brief History

Feng Shui has been practised in China at least since the Tang Dynasty.

The most ancient master in this art is generally believed to be Yang Yun Sang who is universally acknowledged as the Founder of Feng Shui.

Master Yang left a legacy of classic that have been preserved and continuously studied to this day.

He was the principal advisor of the court of the Emperor Hi Tsang (A.D. 888), and his books on Feng Shui made up the major texts on which succeeding generations of practitioners based their art.

Master Yang's emphasis was on the shape of the mountains, the direction of water courses, and above all, on locating and understanding the influence of the Dragon, Cha's most revered celestial creature.

His doctrines were detailed in three famous classic works that wholly describe Feng Shui practice in terms of colourful Dragon metaphors.

The first of these, "Han Lung Ching", contains the "Art of Rousing the Dragon".

The second, "Ching Nang Ao Chih", comprises the methods of determining the location of the Dragon's lair.

While the third book is "I Lung Ching", translated under the title "Canons approximating Dragons".

This third book provides the methods and techniques on how to find the Dragon in areas where they do not prominently stand forth.
 
     
Modern science has only recently discovered that the earth's atmosphere is crowded with powerful but invisible energy waves and lines that enable us to enjoy telephones and radios, fax machines and satellite communications.
Master Yang's principles came to be regarded as the "Form School" of Feng Shui, which rationalises good or bad sites in terms of Dragon symbolism. According to this school, good Feng Shui locations require the presence of the Dragon, and where there is the true Dragon, there will also be found the White Tiger.
   
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